thedropkickmollys:

That’s our fearless leader, Captain Malcolm Reynolds 

thedropkickmollys:

That’s our fearless leader, Captain Malcolm Reynolds 

(via seven7seconds)


This Is the Most Detailed Image of the Universe Ever Captured
NASA has just published the most detailed view of the Universe ever taken. It’s called the Extreme Deep Field—or XDF for short. It took ten years of Hubble Space Telescope photographs to make it and it shows some the oldest galaxies ever observed by humans, going 13.2 billion years back in time.
It’s a mindblowing, extremely humbling view. Not only for what it shows, but for what it doesn’t show. While this image contains about 5,500 galaxies, it only displays a tiny part of the sky, a ridiculously small slice of the Universe.

This Is the Most Detailed Image of the Universe Ever Captured

NASA has just published the most detailed view of the Universe ever taken. It’s called the Extreme Deep Field—or XDF for short. It took ten years of Hubble Space Telescope photographs to make it and it shows some the oldest galaxies ever observed by humans, going 13.2 billion years back in time.

It’s a mindblowing, extremely humbling view. Not only for what it shows, but for what it doesn’t show. While this image contains about 5,500 galaxies, it only displays a tiny part of the sky, a ridiculously small slice of the Universe.

(via kaitlvn)

peashooter85:

Rare and unusual “Femme Fatale” ring pistol, originates from France, third quarter of the 19th century.

Sold at Auction: $11,350

(via seven7seconds)

forestlover:

keyholeslumber:

modestinferno:

circumlocute:

Books that people read romantically but shouldn’t because they’re missing the point:

  1. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
  2. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
  3. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

That’s your opinion.

there’s nothing romantic about a pedophile rapist, the senseless murder-suicide of teenagers because families can’t get their shit together or the hypocrisy of the roaring 20s

FINALLY SOMEONE SAYS IT

(via seven7seconds)

seven7seconds:

evolvapavlove:

morbid-mindset:

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?
More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.(Source)

INCREDIBLE. 

My dad had cardiomyopathy, he was in desperate need of a heart transplant before he died, and something like this was suggested to him as an option way back in the 90s, though I think it was even more of a prototype then than it is now. My mum was generally against testing on animals even for medical reasons until this happened which totally changed her perspective.

I did a project on whole organ decellularization back in the day and they’re making incredible progress with scaffolding and it’s amazing what’s possible with the medical breakthroughs happening.

seven7seconds:

evolvapavlove:

morbid-mindset:

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?

More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.

The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.

Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.

Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.

The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. 

This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.

This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.


(Source)

INCREDIBLE. 

My dad had cardiomyopathy, he was in desperate need of a heart transplant before he died, and something like this was suggested to him as an option way back in the 90s, though I think it was even more of a prototype then than it is now. My mum was generally against testing on animals even for medical reasons until this happened which totally changed her perspective.

I did a project on whole organ decellularization back in the day and they’re making incredible progress with scaffolding and it’s amazing what’s possible with the medical breakthroughs happening.

topographe:


topographe:
August
365 days later

730 days later

topographe:

topographe:

August

365 days later

730 days later

(via n4med)